How many particles?

March 2, 2010

This dual language kiosk created for CERN lets the user enter their sex, height, age and weight to see how many particles are in their body. The average human has 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 particles in their body!

The user could send this information home in an email along with a picture of their favourite particle from the standard model. The information and standard model picture could also be printed out onto t-shirts for visitors to take home with them.

Role
Software project management, UX, Development, Install

Length
1 month. Completed in 2009

Team size
Creative Director, Project manager, 2xUX, 2xDevelopers, 2xInstall crew

Deliverable
3xKiosks

Design process
Interaction audit, concepting, UX and visual design, user testing, design refinements

Energy Density

March 2, 2010

CERN wanted a way of teaching children about particle collision in a fun and engaging way. So I created the user experience behind Energy Density, a set of three dual language interactive stations that let users recreate their own particle collisions!

Through three levels (plus one secret bonus level), users can collide particles to fill the Standard Model with the 16 known and theoretical particles that make up our universe. Users spin a physical dial to increase energy levels and create collisions. Real time generative graphics recreate some of the visual outputs that are seen in the real Large Hadron Collider.

If users can spin the dial fast enough, they reveal facts about each particle in the Standard Model – all the way up to the theoretical Higgs Boson particle.

Role
Software project management, UX, Development, Install

Length
1 month. Completed in 2009

Team size
Creative Director, Project manager, 2xUX, 2xDevelopers, 2xInstall crew

Deliverable
3xKiosks connected to physical dials

Design process
Interaction audit, concepting, UX and visual design, user testing, design refinements

Cyber Seaside

November 27, 2009

The Cyber Seaside is a 4×3 meter interactive floor that invites visitors to learn through fun and pull their ecological weight by playing four interactive games. The Cyber Seaside uses over 2GB of lifelike graphics taken directly from British beaches.

“We wanted to make the site more interactive so that our visitors can spend longer exploring, playing and discovering new things. The new Discovery Zone uses the latest technology and will be really lively, entertaining our visitors but also helping them find out more about penguin behaviour and marine pollution.” Elaine Lambert — Director, Living Coasts

Jump up and down on the enormous interactive floor to clean the beach full of virtual litter, stomp around fishing nets to uncover trapped animals, clean up an oil slick to release trapped penguins or fight against invading seaweed! Children love this exhibit as there is an instant interaction as things can happen under their feet even when they are standing still.

Role
Project management, UX, Design, Install

Length
3 months. Completed in 2008

Team size
Creative Director, Project manager, 2xDesigners, UX, 2xDevelopers, 2xInstall crew

Deliverable
Interactive floor

Design process
Interaction audit, concepting, UX and visual design, user testing, design refinements

Mould Me

November 26, 2009

Mould Me is part of the Purple Planet exhibition at Cadbury World. It features virtual chocolate technology and casting incredibly lifelike chocolate busts of visitors into a hall of fame.

Cadbury were finding that users wanted to take home images of their experience so the software was modified so that the user’s images could be sent to the gift shop. Here they could be printed onto t-shirts, mugs and keyrings. Due to the success of the Purple Planet interactives Cadburys reported that the spend in the gift shop went up by £2 a head, not bad when the attraction sees over 500,000 visitors a year.

Role
Software project management, UX

Length
1 month. Completed in 2008

Team size
Project manager, UX, 2xDevelopers, 2xInstall crew

Deliverable
Installation

Design process
User testing, design refinements